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Is Anonymously the New Way to Network?

A head and shoulders shot of a business person wearing glasses, but their face is invisible.
By Laura Temme, Esq. on February 13, 2020 1:44 PM

Perhaps you're looking to switch from private practice to in-house. Or maybe you find out a colleague is making more money than you. In the past, we'd be encouraged to reach out to someone in our field for advice.

But that is rarely easy. If networking makes you feel awkward, you're not alone. First, you have to find the right person to reach out to. Or you agonize over which coworker to approach about your concerns. Then there's the cold email, where you may or may not get a response.

But, for all the time-wasting and frustration that comes with many social media sites, the privacy offered by some platforms may be the answer to this problem.

Anonymous Networking?

Workplace politics often feel inescapable, and sometimes it can feel like just asking the question might get you in trouble. But social platforms offer varying levels of anonymity. Some even allow you to keep your name out entirely.

Fishbowl is an app aimed at connecting professionals in various fields and allowing them to ask questions of their peers anonymously. It's marketed as a place professionals can get honest answers, while being able to share relatable moments with others in their field. Unlike LinkedIn and other platforms where we're expected to be the "safest" versions of ourselves, an app like Fishbowl gives employees a place to ask questions without fear of repercussions.

Blind, another networking app, focuses on comparing salaries across several industries including IT, healthcare, and gaming. Users can find colleagues at their company (again, anonymously) or compare to their contemporaries at other organizations. In a world where talking about pay is often frowned upon, an anonymous app can help professionals get the answers they need.

What Lawyers Have to Gain

Platforms like this might be especially beneficial for those in the legal field, where both expectations and job stress run high. As lawyers, we have a hard time asking for help because that means admitting we don't have all the answers. Whether you're new to the field or just new to the office, it can be hard to know what you don't know. An anonymous networking app might be the place where constructive, open conversations occur to address the issues plaguing the legal industry - like burnout, diversity, and pay gaps.

Or you can just send some fun memes.

Related Resources:

Will Law Firms Still Be Recognizable in 2030? (FindLaw's Greedy Associates)

Don't Hire on Gut Instinct. Use a Systematic Approach (FindLaw's Strategist)

Social Media Use by Juries: Is There Any Way to Stop It? (FindLaw's Technologist)

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