High School Says Football Star Can't Practice With Home Arrest Ankle Monitor, Despite Court Authorization

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By George Khoury, Esq. on April 27, 2017 11:59 AM

A high school football star might not be allowed play his senior year of high school ball due to pending felony robbery charges. This is the case despite the fact that he's rumored to have a pending scholarship offer from a Division I school and is expected to be highly recruited. Shelley Singletary, along with another teen, is alleged to have robbed an 11-year-old boy of his Air Jordan sneakers and bicycle. Singletary, while pending resolution of the charges, has essentially been under house arrest since being released from custody.

While the court has stated that it will not object to Singletary participating in football practice while wearing the home arrest ankle monitor, the high school has stated that he has not been cleared by the school to participate, and that Singletary is not currently affiliated with the team.

Stealing Air Jordans From a Baby

While it is not too terribly unusual for young athletes in the limelight to get caught executing poor judgment, it rarely sinks to the level of stealing Air Jordans and toys from children. The details of this case are pretty far outside what is normally expected when high school or college athletes get in legal trouble. The high school is refusing to let Singletary play until the criminal matter is resolved.

Singletary was allegedly riding around in a car with three other teens when the group spotted the young victim. Singletary and one other teen allegedly exited the vehicle a forcibly stole the Air Jordans right off the child's feet. One of the other teens allegedly returned to the scene later and threatened the young boy, warning not to contact the police.

Although the charges are still pending, an action like this has the potential to cause serious problems for Singletary down the road. NCAA schools must follow strict rules in regards to player conduct, both on and off the field, and many universities have policies regarding the off-field conduct of their student athletes.

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