Tarnished Twenty- The FindLaw Sports Law Blog

July 2018 Archives

Fighter Conor McGregor was looking at a multi-year jail sentence if convicted of three counts of assault and one count of criminal mischief stemming from a bout he had with a bus in Brooklyn this April. But the former UFC champ and one-time boxer will avoid incarceration by pleading guilty to just one misdemeanor count of disorderly conduct.

Most importantly, McGregor will also escape without a criminal record, meaning he can travel freely and return to the octagon, possibly by the end of the year.

Around 7 p.m. Sunday night, Sacramento State University campus police were alerted to an erratic driver on campus. At 7:33 p.m., according to Sonoma State spokesperson Paul Gullixson, a car struck a tree on campus. The driver of that car was Roseville High School cheer coach Gabriella Vega, whose blood alcohol level at the time was 0.25 -- more than three times the legal limit. Also in the car with her was a 17-year-old student, who school district spokesperson John Becker said needed a ride back to the campus dorms because she wasn't able to walk back.

The pair were attending a cheer camp on Sonoma State's campus. It was the first night of the four-day camp.

Over 100 former Ohio State students have reported firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct committed by Richard Strauss, a former team doctor at the school from the mid-1970s to the 1990s. Strauss's time at the university overlapped with that of current Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan, who was an assistant wrestling coach at the university from 1987 to 1995. Former wrestlers claim Jordan, founder of the powerful, far-right congressional Freedom Caucus, was aware of the abuse and did nothing to stop it.

Last week, five former wrestlers filed two class-action lawsuits against Ohio State for failing to act after learning of alleged complaints about Strauss' behavior more than 20 years ago, one of which names Jim Jordan.

USA Diving Sued for Ignoring Alleged Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse in youth and collegiate sports has become far too common. From Dr. Larry Nassar at Michigan State to Jerry Sandusky at Penn State, coaches have been known to use their position of power and authority to coerce athletes into performing sexual acts in exchange for favor and attention. Popular youth sports such as soccer and swimming have seen their fair share of sexual abuse scandals.

And now, USA Diving. Who is at fault and how can it be prevented? These are two issues coming to light in a class-action lawsuit filed against USA Diving accusing William Bohonyi of preying on at least two female divers while he was a USA Diving coach at the Ohio State University Diving Club.

Scientists are still wrapping their heads around chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease discovered, most notably, in ex-NFL players. Researchers still haven't found tests to definitively identify CTE in living people, but they are pinpointing signs and symptoms displayed by those with CTE before they die, from confusion, disorientation, dizziness, and headaches in early stages to dementia, depression, suicidality, social instability, and impulsive behavior in later stages.

And while science is still trying to sort out how CTE works, criminal attorneys are trying to figure out if the brain disease can work as a defense to criminal behavior. Here's a look.