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In February of this year, San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster was arrested on charges of domestic violence, threats, and possession of an assault weapon. And it didn't take long for at least domestic charges to get resolved.

A Santa Clara judge dismissed those charges last week, after ruling there was insufficient evidence to proceed with his domestic violence case. Foster pleaded not guilty to the assault weapons charge, which was reduced from a felony to a misdemeanor.

The prospect of players kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality and criminal justice inequality sent President Donald Trump into such apoplectic fits last season that NFL team owners felt compelled to act before the 2018 season kicks off. And act they did.

The owners voted yesterday to remove a requirement for players to be on the field for the national anthem, giving them the option to stay in the locker room. If players do come onto the field for the anthem, however, their teams can get fined if the players fail to stand and "show respect for the flag and the Anthem." Here's a closer look.

A Florida parent of a high school football team captain complained on Twitter about the school's athletic director "falling down drunk and driving on school property multiple times while supervising students." Curiously though, the parent is now facing a legal battle. 

Pompano Beach High Athletic Director Jason Frey sued parent Larry Little for libel and slander. The lawsuit is apparently the latest shot fired in a feud that allegedly stems from Frey suspending Little from volunteering with the football team.

Here's a closer look at the legal spat.

The relationship between NFL cheerleaders and the teams that employ them has gotten quite litigious over the past few years. The Buffalo Jills sued the Bills franchise, claiming hundreds of hours of unpaid labor along with harassment and degrading sexual comments at team events. A Raiderette sued the Oakland team for numerous wage and hour violations related to minimum wage, overtime, expenses, and breaks. Heck, a San Francisco 49ers cheerleaders even filed a class action lawsuit against the NFL itself, claiming the league "conspired with the Defendant NFL Member Teams to coordinate, encourage, facilitate, and implement the agreement in order to pay female athletes below fair market value."

The lawsuits are often drawn out legal quagmires and in rare cases can result in six-figure settlements that include strong reminders from the teams that they deny any liability or wrongdoing. But two cheerleaders who filed lawsuits against the NFL have a much different settlement idea -- $1 apiece and a meeting with Commissioner Roger Goodell.

Concussions have become so common in football that players, for the most part, now know the risks they are undertaking by playing the sport. Likewise, lawsuits involving concussed players have become so common that coaches, administrators, and medical staff are knowledgeable and diligent enough to recognize concussion symptoms and provide treatment as soon as possible. At least, they should be.

That's what one former high school football player claimed in a lawsuit against a San Diego school district after a failure to diagnose and treat a concussion led to brain swelling, emergency surgery, a medically induced coma, and permanent damage to his brain. The school district settled the lawsuit this week, for $7.1 million.

Divorced Parents Go to Court Over Son Playing HS Football

Divorce can certainly take a heavy toll on a family. But in a unique case out of Pittsburgh, one former husband-and-wife team is taking the acrimony to new levels by playing tug-of-war with their son's ability to play high school football.

In this case, one parent thinks the sport is too dangerous, while the other thinks the benefits outweigh the risks. And it's not what you think -- dad is actually the one saying "no" to football. But who decides? And will junior be forced to sit on the sidelines until the case is resolved?

How Will the New Tax Law Affect Sports Teams?

Your favorite hometown sports team may be planning more than just its next game plan or roster move. Tax reform is here, and everyone from the local sports bar to the hot dog vendor might be doing the math to figure out how it affects their bottom line. 

The new tax law changes will impact everything from college athletics to corporate ticket purchases and sports financing. So what's the inside story?

Can a Lawsuit Stop Super Bowl Counterfeit Tickets?

Are those Super Bowl tickets legit? In an effort to stomp out that unnerving question in the lead up to the big game, the New England Patriots, Philadelphia Eagles, and the NFL are teaming up -- in a courtroom, at least.

A lawsuit filed in Minnesota state court seeks a temporary restraining order and injunctive relief to combat counterfeiters selling fake tickets, jerseys, helmets, and other NFL and team gear.

A drug kingpin being sentenced to decades behind bars sounds pretty ordinary. But Owen Hanson was no ordinary kingpin.

The former high school volleyball standout and University of Southern California football walk-on turned his notoriety and personality into illegal gambling and drug trafficking enterprises, according to federal prosecutors. And a federal judge has now sentenced Hanson to 21 years and three months in prison.

Donovan McNabb, Marshall Faulk, Warren Sapp, Ike Taylor, Eric Davis, and Heath Evans. All former NFL stars who've been to Super Bowls or Pro Bowls in their careers; all accused of sexual misconduct during their time as analysts on the NFL Network; and all (of those still employed) suspended from their current jobs at that network or ESPN in the wake of a former stylist's lawsuit.

Jami Cantor claims those players made lewd comments and sexual advances, sent her sexually explicit texts and photos, and even groped her at work, and is suing NFL Network for discrimination, sexual harassment, hostile work environment, retaliation, and wrongful termination.