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Just as former NFL players had done with their league, dozens of professional wrestlers had filed lawsuits claiming World Wrestling Entertainment knew of the risks of repeated head injuries and concussions and failed to warn them. But six of those lawsuits didn't follow the script, according to a federal judge in WWE's home state of Connecticut.

U.S. District Judge Vanessa Bryant tossed a series of suits over the top rope for failing to "comply with Federal Rules of Civil Procedure" or even "set forth the factual basis of their claims or defenses clearly and concisely in separately numbered paragraphs."

Sports blogging can be an unrequited love. While a select few have made careers out of covering sports online, the vast majority, those that create most of the content and account for most of the traffic, are underpaid, if they're paid at all. A Deadspin report on sports blogging empire SB Nation last year noted that "Many, perhaps even most, contributors do not get paid; no one is paid well."

Weeks after that piece published, Cheryl Bradley, a site manager at SB Nation Colorado Avalanche blog Mile High Hockey, filed a lawsuit against SB Nation parent company Vox Media, claiming federal wage and hour law violations. This week, a judge refused to dismiss the case, ruling that there were legitimate questions about whether the bloggers and site managers were Vox employees or independent contractors.

David Katz, a white, 24-year-old allegedly angry after a loss during a "Madden NFL 19" competition in Jacksonville, Florida on Sunday, left the GLHF Game Bar, retrieved two guns from his car, and shot 13 people at the event, killing two and eventually killing himself. Katz was visiting from Baltimore for the e-sports event, and, according to the Associated Press, had previously been hospitalized for mental illness.

USA Today is also reporting that survivors of the shooting have filed a "negligent security" lawsuit, although the law firm that announced the suit has declined to name its clients or the proposed targets of the litigation.

On July 22, 2017 Louisville was under a heat advisory. The heat index the previous day had been 107 degrees. Still, the Saint Xavier cross country team conducted practice, including a 12-mile run, at a local park. One runner, Cooper Marchal, suffered a heat stroke during the practice, during which he lost consciousness, was hospitalized, and was put in a medically-induced coma.

Now Marchal is suing the school, claiming it "was negligent in hiring, training, educating, and supervising its coaches and coaching staff," who "failed to adequately supervise, screen, test, monitor, and treat the student runners for heat-related injuries and illness."

Once the Supreme Court opened the door to legalized sports betting by overturning a federal ban in May, you knew a whole bunch of states would walk through it as soon as possible. Why should Nevada have all the fun, anyway? Of course, those new gambling regimes can take a lot of forms, and removal of the federal prohibition on sports betting merely set the stage for states to step in with their own regulations and restrictions.

Now, just a few short months later, what does that landscape look like nationwide? Here's what's up with state sports gambling laws right now.

Fighter Conor McGregor was looking at a multi-year jail sentence if convicted of three counts of assault and one count of criminal mischief stemming from a bout he had with a bus in Brooklyn this April. But the former UFC champ and one-time boxer will avoid incarceration by pleading guilty to just one misdemeanor count of disorderly conduct.

Most importantly, McGregor will also escape without a criminal record, meaning he can travel freely and return to the octagon, possibly by the end of the year.

Around 7 p.m. Sunday night, Sacramento State University campus police were alerted to an erratic driver on campus. At 7:33 p.m., according to Sonoma State spokesperson Paul Gullixson, a car struck a tree on campus. The driver of that car was Roseville High School cheer coach Gabriella Vega, whose blood alcohol level at the time was 0.25 -- more than three times the legal limit. Also in the car with her was a 17-year-old student, who school district spokesperson John Becker said needed a ride back to the campus dorms because she wasn't able to walk back.

The pair were attending a cheer camp on Sonoma State's campus. It was the first night of the four-day camp.

Over 100 former Ohio State students have reported firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct committed by Richard Strauss, a former team doctor at the school from the mid-1970s to the 1990s. Strauss's time at the university overlapped with that of current Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan, who was an assistant wrestling coach at the university from 1987 to 1995. Former wrestlers claim Jordan, founder of the powerful, far-right congressional Freedom Caucus, was aware of the abuse and did nothing to stop it.

Last week, five former wrestlers filed two class-action lawsuits against Ohio State for failing to act after learning of alleged complaints about Strauss' behavior more than 20 years ago, one of which names Jim Jordan.

USA Diving Sued for Ignoring Alleged Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse in youth and collegiate sports has become far too common. From Dr. Larry Nassar at Michigan State to Jerry Sandusky at Penn State, coaches have been known to use their position of power and authority to coerce athletes into performing sexual acts in exchange for favor and attention. Popular youth sports such as soccer and swimming have seen their fair share of sexual abuse scandals.

And now, USA Diving. Who is at fault and how can it be prevented? These are two issues coming to light in a class-action lawsuit filed against USA Diving accusing William Bohonyi of preying on at least two female divers while he was a USA Diving coach at the Ohio State University Diving Club.

After pleading guilty to several sexual assault and child pornography charges, former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. And one of his former employers, Michigan State University is trying to bring its culpability in his decades of abuse to an end.

The school, accused of covering up complaints of Nassar's treatment of students and athletes while he was employed in the athletics department, has reportedly agreed to pay $500 million to 332 women who say they were assaulted by Nassar.