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After pleading guilty to several sexual assault and child pornography charges, former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. And one of his former employers, Michigan State University is trying to bring its culpability in his decades of abuse to an end.

The school, accused of covering up complaints of Nassar's treatment of students and athletes while he was employed in the athletics department, has reportedly agreed to pay $500 million to 332 women who say they were assaulted by Nassar.

Anti-sports betting laws have often seemed inconsistent. Why can I wager on a game in Las Vegas, but not in Los Angeles? Betting on baseball is cool on one side of Lake Tahoe, but not the other?

A federal gambling statute provided a loophole for Nevada that it denied other states, and some of those states, mainly New Jersey, weren't too happy about that disparate treatment. And the Supreme Court agreed, striking down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act and paving the way for states to decide whether they want to legalize sports betting.

Gabriel Reed has been telling investors that he can organize World Wrestling Entertainment events and hard rock concerts for years. And now those false claims have earned him years behind bars.

Reed, who had been operating as Gabe Reed Productions was sentenced to 57 months in federal prison on wire fraud charges, after promising investors big name events and then using their money for personal expenses like rent and travel.

Few fighters know how to put their face into the media spotlight better than Conor McGregor. But today he's getting attention for all the wrong reasons, and probably a mugshot to boot.

McGregor and his entourage crashed a UFC media event in Brooklyn last night and attacked a bus carrying other UFC fighters. This morning, he was arraigned on assault and criminal mischief charges.

Way back in 2006, during his first stint with the Cleveland Cavaliers, LeBron James carried the team to its first playoff appearance in almost a decade. A few short months later, eight enterprising individuals registered "BELIEVELAND" with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Since then, the Ohio company (doing business out of Marietta, Georgia) has been making clothing, drink ware, and signage bearing the "Believeland" name.

Then this year comes the Believeland Beer Fest, a Cleveland festival (run by a Chicago entity), selling tickets and merchandise "including t-shirts, beer glasses, bottle openers, stickers, foam fingers, and beer doozies marked with BELIEVELAND BEER FEST."

Now the two out-of-towners are going to battle it out in an Ohio federal court for the keys to the Believeland kingdom.

WWE Beat Head Trauma Lawsuit Against Former Wrestlers

If your bosses know about certain risks to people in your profession, but they don't tell you about it, you'd probably feel compelled to sue them if and when you got injured. This can apply to anyone -- even professional wrestlers with World Wrestling Entertainment. Unfortunately for two such wrestlers, a judge in Connecticut has dismissed their claims that the WWE knew about the dangers of head trauma and failed to inform them.

Tonya Harding: What Crimes Did She Commit?

Oscar season is approaching, and this year's batch of nominees reaches back to the ghosts of sports crimes past. The Oscars announced last week that Margot Robbie and Allison Janney have been nominated for their respective roles in I, Tonya, a movie that revisits the career of Tonya Harding and the crime that shocked the ice-skating world twenty-four years ago.

It's a tale of rivalry, fame and a bizarrely conceived crime that's worth a trip down memory lane.

2017: The Year in Sports Law

It was a busy year, on and off the field. While players and coaches were vying for championships, lawyers and judges were working overtime behind the scenes, sorting out some enormous legal issues in the sports world.

Here are the major sports law stories from 2017:

The allegations against former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar have been horrifying. Just going by what has been revealed through court documents, Nassar's sexual abuse of athletes and other children in his care, some as young as six years old, continued for at least 20 years and could have involved over 200 victims.

Now, the institutions that employed Nassar for decades are trying to distance themselves from his actions. But a new lawsuit, filed by Olympic gold medalist McKayla Maroney, claims Michigan State and the U.S. Olympic team bought victims' silence with settlements, including a nondisclosure and nondisparagement agreements.

Doping allegations have plagued Russian athletes for years. Prior to the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, the World Anti-Doping Agency concluded that Russia's Anti-Doping Agency, its Ministry of Sport, and Federal Security Service operated a "state-directed" doping system and Russian athletes were banned from the competition. Part of the evidence used for that ruling came from the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

More allegations appear to have doomed Russia's participation in the next Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The International Olympic Committee has banned Russian athletes from participating in the Games, and also forbid government officials from attending.