Tarnished Twenty- The FindLaw Sports Law Blog

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Once the Supreme Court opened the door to legalized sports betting by overturning a federal ban in May, you knew a whole bunch of states would walk through it as soon as possible. Why should Nevada have all the fun, anyway? Of course, those new gambling regimes can take a lot of forms, and removal of the federal prohibition on sports betting merely set the stage for states to step in with their own regulations and restrictions.

Now, just a few short months later, what does that landscape look like nationwide? Here's what's up with state sports gambling laws right now.

Fighter Conor McGregor was looking at a multi-year jail sentence if convicted of three counts of assault and one count of criminal mischief stemming from a bout he had with a bus in Brooklyn this April. But the former UFC champ and one-time boxer will avoid incarceration by pleading guilty to just one misdemeanor count of disorderly conduct.

Most importantly, McGregor will also escape without a criminal record, meaning he can travel freely and return to the octagon, possibly by the end of the year.

Around 7 p.m. Sunday night, Sacramento State University campus police were alerted to an erratic driver on campus. At 7:33 p.m., according to Sonoma State spokesperson Paul Gullixson, a car struck a tree on campus. The driver of that car was Roseville High School cheer coach Gabriella Vega, whose blood alcohol level at the time was 0.25 -- more than three times the legal limit. Also in the car with her was a 17-year-old student, who school district spokesperson John Becker said needed a ride back to the campus dorms because she wasn't able to walk back.

The pair were attending a cheer camp on Sonoma State's campus. It was the first night of the four-day camp.

Over 100 former Ohio State students have reported firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct committed by Richard Strauss, a former team doctor at the school from the mid-1970s to the 1990s. Strauss's time at the university overlapped with that of current Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan, who was an assistant wrestling coach at the university from 1987 to 1995. Former wrestlers claim Jordan, founder of the powerful, far-right congressional Freedom Caucus, was aware of the abuse and did nothing to stop it.

Last week, five former wrestlers filed two class-action lawsuits against Ohio State for failing to act after learning of alleged complaints about Strauss' behavior more than 20 years ago, one of which names Jim Jordan.

USA Diving Sued for Ignoring Alleged Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse in youth and collegiate sports has become far too common. From Dr. Larry Nassar at Michigan State to Jerry Sandusky at Penn State, coaches have been known to use their position of power and authority to coerce athletes into performing sexual acts in exchange for favor and attention. Popular youth sports such as soccer and swimming have seen their fair share of sexual abuse scandals.

And now, USA Diving. Who is at fault and how can it be prevented? These are two issues coming to light in a class-action lawsuit filed against USA Diving accusing William Bohonyi of preying on at least two female divers while he was a USA Diving coach at the Ohio State University Diving Club.

After pleading guilty to several sexual assault and child pornography charges, former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. And one of his former employers, Michigan State University is trying to bring its culpability in his decades of abuse to an end.

The school, accused of covering up complaints of Nassar's treatment of students and athletes while he was employed in the athletics department, has reportedly agreed to pay $500 million to 332 women who say they were assaulted by Nassar.

Anti-sports betting laws have often seemed inconsistent. Why can I wager on a game in Las Vegas, but not in Los Angeles? Betting on baseball is cool on one side of Lake Tahoe, but not the other?

A federal gambling statute provided a loophole for Nevada that it denied other states, and some of those states, mainly New Jersey, weren't too happy about that disparate treatment. And the Supreme Court agreed, striking down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act and paving the way for states to decide whether they want to legalize sports betting.

Gabriel Reed has been telling investors that he can organize World Wrestling Entertainment events and hard rock concerts for years. And now those false claims have earned him years behind bars.

Reed, who had been operating as Gabe Reed Productions was sentenced to 57 months in federal prison on wire fraud charges, after promising investors big name events and then using their money for personal expenses like rent and travel.

Few fighters know how to put their face into the media spotlight better than Conor McGregor. But today he's getting attention for all the wrong reasons, and probably a mugshot to boot.

McGregor and his entourage crashed a UFC media event in Brooklyn last night and attacked a bus carrying other UFC fighters. This morning, he was arraigned on assault and criminal mischief charges.

Way back in 2006, during his first stint with the Cleveland Cavaliers, LeBron James carried the team to its first playoff appearance in almost a decade. A few short months later, eight enterprising individuals registered "BELIEVELAND" with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Since then, the Ohio company (doing business out of Marietta, Georgia) has been making clothing, drink ware, and signage bearing the "Believeland" name.

Then this year comes the Believeland Beer Fest, a Cleveland festival (run by a Chicago entity), selling tickets and merchandise "including t-shirts, beer glasses, bottle openers, stickers, foam fingers, and beer doozies marked with BELIEVELAND BEER FEST."

Now the two out-of-towners are going to battle it out in an Ohio federal court for the keys to the Believeland kingdom.