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Could Paul Ceglia's Email Prove He Owns Half of Facebook?

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By Stephanie Rabiner, Esq. on April 19, 2011 6:46 AM

Paul Ceglia, who has been steadfast in his claims that a 2003 investment and programming contract entitles him to a portion of Facebook, amended his lawsuit against Mark Zuckerburg last week to include new evidence.

The evidence? A series of emails from 2003 and 2004 that purportedly demonstrate that Ceglia is entitled to 50% of the social network.

Facebook maintains that the emails are fake.

According to the lawsuit and the new emails, Mark Zuckerburg had agreed that, for every day that the Facebook launch was delayed, Ceglia would receive 1% of the company. At the time of the first email, Ceglia was to receive 80% of Facebook.

Finding this unfair, Mark Zuckerburg suggested a 50/50 partnership to which Paul Ceglia agreed.

Ceglia's new attorneys from DLA Piper assert that they've done their due diligence and have verified the emails in both electronic and printed form, reports ABC News. However, electronic emails are quite easy to forge--even for a lay person.

Surprisingly, the verification of the emails is likely to rest on their written contents, not their trajectory through the internet.

There's a tool, developed by the NSA, called "unmask.py" that entities, including courts, use to analyze the text and word choice in emails. It uses statistical analysis and can pick up on discrepancies in a writer's tone.

Between this analysis tool and Mark Zuckerburg's original hard drives (they were part of the evidence in the Winklevoss lawsuit and should contain these emails), we should know pretty soon whether Ceglia's emails are fake.

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