Skip to main content

Are you a legal professional? Visit our professional site

Search for legal issues
For help near (city, ZIP code or county)
Please enter a legal issue and/or a location

Book Review: Android Apps in One Hour For Lawyers

Article Placeholder Image
By William Peacock, Esq. on May 15, 2013 3:58 PM

As a faithful Nexus 4 and Nexus 7 (Google’s homebrewed Android phone and tablet, respectively) user, I am almost as enthusiastic about Android as that Droid Lawyer guy. So when I received an email from the ABA announcing the newly published Android Apps in One Hour for Lawyers by Daniel Siegel, my curiosity was piqued. A book that promises to introduce me to an already familiar world? Why not? Maybe I’ll learn something new.

Best of all? The ABA kindly provided a copy of the book for review, saving my $40 for more apps.

Who This is For

You know that recalcitrant middle-aged attorney who won't part from his flip phone? When his daughter (or the IT department) gives him a new Android device, this book is the absolutely perfect companion. It very clearly introduces the reader to the operating system, the app stores (including Handango, which I had never heard of), and the mystical world of the cloud. It also provides blurbs on hundreds of apps that handle such titillating tasks as legal research, encrypted cloud storage, and of course, billable hours.

If you are new to smartphones, or are switching from an iPhone, this book, with its clear language and color pictures, will guide you along the path to smartphone nirvana. Just note, the 131 pages (not counting the index, of course) will take a heck of a lot longer than an hour to get through, especially if you download apps or tweak your phone settings along the way.

Who This is Not For

Me. The geek. The Android veteran. While Siegel's list of apps is handy, and I'll surely reference it in the near future, a list of apps isn't worth the $40 that the book commands.

The Verdict

It's clearly written, has concise, yet detailed descriptions of the various apps, and provides step-by-step instructions for even the slightly-complicated tasks, like allowing third-party app stores to install their own apps (a must if you prefer Amazon's app store over Google Play). For those new to the world of Android, this book and a few hours of your time will save you weeks of frustration.

On the other hand, for those already versed in Google's mobile OS, it won't add much beyond a couple of great app recommendations.

Disclosure: A review copy of this book was provided by the American Bar Association; no compensation was received in exchange for this review. All opinions expressed are the author's own.

Related Resources:

Find a Lawyer

More Options