AI and the Law: Top 7 Recent Developments

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By Casey C. Sullivan, Esq. on June 22, 2016 12:57 PM

Artificial intelligence is finally moving into the legal world. Within the past two months, two major firms have partnered with artificial intelligence companies, hoping to hand over a sliver of their legal work to robot lawyers. But despite the emergence of AI-assisted BigLaw firms, lawyers have been slow to adopt artificial intelligence and machine learning technology, and reasonable skepticism remains. After all, your computer program might win on Jeopardy, but can it pass the bar?

Which is to say, when it comes to AI and the law, the field is still in flux. To give you a quick overview, here are seven of our top recent posts on artificial intelligence, from the freshest section of the FindLaw archives.

1. Clients Want Artificial Intelligence and They Want It Soon-ish

The push to adopt artificial intelligence in the law won't come from lawyers, most likely. Instead, as large clients, such as banks and financial institutions, begin to implement AI into their daily practices, they will demand that their lawyers follow suit.

2. BigLaw Firm Brings Artificial Intelligence on Board

In May, BakerHostetler became the first major law firm to partner with an artificial intelligence company. The move puts machine learning technology, best known for winning at Jeopardy and creating personalized recipes, to work for legal research, a first for BigLaw.

3. BigLaw AI Wars: DLA Piper Strikes Deal With Kira Systems

BigLaw's cautious embrace of AI continues with DLA Piper. The massive firm recently announced that it was joining forces with another AI company, allowing it to use the novel technology in M&A document review.

4. Are AI Legal Programs Beagle and ROSS Ready to Replace Attorneys?

Does artificial intelligence mean the end of flesh-based lawyers? Not any time soon. But AI-focused legal tech companies are starting to chip away at tasks that were once the exclusive purview of human lawyers.

5. As Machines Learn, Will They Learn the Law? Will They Follow It?

AI means more to the law than just robot attorneys. As machine learning becomes more common, some scholars worry that computer programs could learn, independently, how to evade or violate the law.

6. Judges Love Tech in the Courtroom, Even When They Don't Use It

A recent survey of New York City judges showed broad approval for increased use of technology in courts. But as we think about the technological future of the law, the survey offers an important reminder: much of the legal system is still struggling to catch up to basic technological developments, like email scheduling and electronic filing.

7. Hawking: Artificial Intelligence a Threat to Humans

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