How Technology Can Help With Deposition Review

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By George Khoury, Esq. on September 27, 2018 11:20 AM

When it comes to reviewing depositions, a little technology can really make a huge difference. If you received a digital file, chances are good that you should be able to run text searches on your computer to find relevant testimony or something you remembered being said from that day.

And if you're using the right software, then applying highlighting or underlining, or inserting notes, could be as simple as clicking along as you read. Other software allows you to go even further in the review process by categorizing testimony, having collaboration tools, and even grouping together certain depositions for easier document management.

Picking the Right Deposition Software

Depending on what you need, and want to be able to do, the right software is more than likely already out there. Though using the traditional deposition review methods of combing through paper copies with four pages per printed side has its upside (you can spill all the coffee you want on those pages), the tiny text and then having to go back through to carefully underline for the court (on pages you can't spill coffee on), really just isn't close to being as efficient as using specialized software.

Curiously though, one depo tool that is exclusive to the IPad seems to be getting the nod of approval by the ABA Journal. Thanks to the fact that digital copies are now the norm, many attorneys have already discovered the fact that you can carry thousands of depositions on a single IPad or tablet, and review for as long as you have battery life. But what you can do with the stock applications is generally limited. And that is where TranscriptPad comes in.

As the ABA Journal noted, it helps with collaborating across teams, preparing highlighted depositions for the court, and even grouping multiple depositions together. Also, notably, the app has been around for quite some time, as we reported on it back in 2012 when it was a mere $50 app. Now, 6 years later, it costs $90. For the fast-paced app market, that's rather telling and a real accomplishment.

There are other options out there, but if you're still reviewing depositions on paper, you may want to consider making a change, for efficiency's sake, not to mention the cost savings on the paper.

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