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Is Skype Getting More Useful for Attorneys?

For attorneys, getting on a video chat with a potential client, or an expert witness, is a great way to avoid actually having an in-person meeting. And with the prevalence of smartphones, and integrated microphones and webcams in computers, video calls are easier than ever before.

Unfortunately, due to the fact that not everyone's cellular phone service will be compatible for video calling (notably thanks to the Android/Apple divide), or will allow video or even regular calls across platforms, services like Skype can really stand in as a perfect alternative. However, attorneys have often questioned whether Skype was a viable and secure option, but that may no longer be an issue with the latest updates.

Skype Encryption

Along with major UI improvements, the new update, dubbed Skype for Life, adds encryption for added security. Interestingly, it also added call recording functionality as well. Both of these features have been sought after by users.

For attorneys, using Skype is an easy way to connect with clients and potential clients who might spend more time on a computer than phone, or may have phone connectivity issues. And what's even better, for basic use, it's free, and can work for you on any of your computers or devices. Unfortunately, if you currently use one of Skype's older platforms, you may be in for a surprise as the older legacy platforms will no longer be supported.

Connecting Is Critical

While you can't really look someone eye to eye via a video call, video calls are certainly more personal than regular voice calls. There's something about being able to connect a face to a voice, and for clients to see that they actually have your full attention. Simply put, video calling is a strong way to connect with potential clients and one that many attorneys just choose to not leverage, despite there being virtually no associated costs at this point.

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